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Oliver Lee Jackson and Rachel Eulena Williams

Untitled Art Fair

Miami Beach, Miami

5-9 December, 2018

Canvas and cotton rope wall sculpture

Rachel Eulena Williams, Lilith's Oolio, 2018, acrylic, flashe and PVA on canvas and cotton rope.

Canvas and cotton rope wall piece

Rachel Eulena Williams, Part One Consciousness, 2018, acrylic, flashe and PVA on canvas and cotton.

Canvas and cotton rope wall sculpture

Rachel Eulena Williams, Part Two Consciousness, 2018, acrylic, flashe and PVA on canvas and cotton rope.

Applied brightly-colored fabric, mixed media on panel.

Oliver Lee Jackson, No. 6 (4.28.15), 2015, applied fabric, mixed media on panel.

Applied earth-toned fabric, mixed media on canvas.

Oliver Lee Jackson, No. 5, 2015, applied fabric, mixed media on canvas.

Press Release

Burning in Water is pleased to feature a two-artist presentation at Untitled Art Fair Miami Beach 2018 highlighting recent works by the Brooklyn-based artist Rachel Eulena Williams and the Oakland-based artist Oliver Lee Jackson.

Using shaped elements of canvas and rope, Rachel Eulena Williams creates complex, beguiling wall works that are utterly free of the typical constraints of stretched canvas paintings. Instead, Williams employs disparate fragments of un-stretched canvas arranged in topographical compositions held in place by painted rope. Liberated from any conventional system of structure or support, Williams' compositions inhabit and activate space in an utterly unique manner. Defying facile categorization as either painting or sculpture, Williams' works are simultaneously disorienting, whimsical and arresting.

Since his emergence in the late 1960s in association with the Black Artists Group (BAG) in St. Louis, Oliver Lee Jackson has created a singular body of work over the past five decades. Jackson's paintings typically conjoin elements of abstraction and figuration even while standing resolutely apart from such categories. Drawing upon a wide array of both Western and non-Western influences, Jackson creates paintings intended to serve as portals into the viewer's own consciousness and imagination. For Jackson, the meaning of his paintings lie beyond the works themselves, with the paintings operating as subjects of contemplation and ultimately transcendence for the viewer.

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