Skip to content

Anthem-X

Curated by Jared Owens

Miami, FL

November 29 – December 3, 2022

Stephanie H. Shih Fortune Cookies, 2022 Porcelain, plastic bag, twist tie 12½ x 9½ x 8½ in.
Stephanie H. Shih Dumplings, 2022 Porcelain, plastic bag, twist tie 13 x 9½ x 8½ in.
Sylvia Maier The Beheading, 2020 Oil on canvas 67 x 136 in.
Jared Owens Series 111 #3, 2022 Mixed media on panel, soil from prison yard at F.C.I. Fairton 48 x 48 in.
Jared Owens Series 111 #5, 2022 Mixed media on panel, soil from prison yard at F.C.I. Fairton, lino printing 48 x 48 in.
Jared Owens Series 111 #8, 2022 Mixed media on panel, soil from prison yard at F.C.I. Fairton, lino printing 48 x 48 in.
Jared Owens Series 111 #9, 2022 Mixed media on panel, soil from prison yard at F.C.I. Fairton, lino printing 48 x 48 in.
Jared Owens Series 111 #10, 2022 Mixed media on panel, soil from prison yard at F.C.I. Fairton, lino printing 48 x 48 in.
Jared Owens Series 111 #12, 2022 Mixed media on panel, burlap pig feed sack, soil from prison yard at F.C.I. Fairton 48 x 48 in.
Melissa Joseph If you squint you can see the Statue of Liberty, 2022 Needle felted wool on industrial felt and soda fired porcelain with celadon glaze 13 x 8 in.
Patricia Encarnación La real cura., 2022 Glazed ceramics 6 x 8 x 3 in.
Bubi Canal Union III, 2019 Archival pigment print 30 x 20 in.
Bubi Canal Union IV, 2019 Archival pigment print 30 x 20 in.
Bryana Bibbs 8.15.22.2, 2022 Handwoven snap, resin, angelina fiber, and hand-spun wool and alpaca fleece 14½ x 11½ in.
Bryana Bibbs 8.4.22.1, 2022 Handwoven shells, paper, sticker, paper clip, nametag, elastic, mineral; hand-spun wool and silk 14 x 11 in.
Bryana Bibbs 7.26.22/8.1.22, 2022 Handwoven drive band, resin, shells, and handwoven wool 21 x 12 in.
Bryana Bibbs 7.14.22.2, 2022 Handwoven shells, rocks, and hand-spun wool 14½ x 9 in.
Bryana Bibbs 7.10.22 - 7.11.22, 2022 Handwoven rocks, driftwood, shells, hand-spun wool and nylon fiber 14 x 9 in.
Bryana Bibbs 7.13.22 - 7.14.22.1, 2022 Handwoven cardstock, angelina fiber, rocks, marble, and hand-spun wool 14½ x 9 in.
Daveed Baptiste Untitled, 2022 20 x 30 in.
Nazeer Sabree, The Vibration of Solace, 2022
Sagarika Sundaram Sappho Says, 2021 Wool, bamboo, viscose 23½ x 30¾ x 0¾ in.
Athena LaTocha Burning, Sulphuric, Violent, 2020 Shellac ink, World Trade Center building sand on paper 132 x 204 in.
Jesse Krimes Of Beauty and Decay; or, not (white), 2018 glass, steel, tree root, artificial plant, transparency film, digital print, acrylic 17 x 24 x 81 in.
Ernesto Renda  Knife's Edge (Single White Female, 1992), 2022  Telephone, screws, acrylic, wax pastel, canvas, glue relief on panel  24¼ x 36¼ x 3½ in.
Helina Metaferia Out of My Mouth, 2018 Collaged paper
Yuval Pudik After a Lengthy Silence, A Mother Falls Into Formlessness, 2022 Paint and printed matter collage on linen 56 x 56 in.
Yuval Pudik Rumors, 2018 Graphite and spray paint on paper 42 x 42 in.
Russell Craig  Where do you want your body sent?, 2022  Acrylic on textiles and leather purse fragments  60 x 60 in.
Jesse Krimes Pelican Bay, 2022 Antique quilt, used clothing collected from incarcerated people, assorted textiles 89 x 68 in.
Amy Myers Dirac Vedam, 2022 Oil on canvas 60 x 60 in.
Foad Satterfield Woodfox No. 3, 2016 Acrylic on canvas 48 x 96 in.
Foad Satterfield Woodfox No. 4, 2016 Acrylic on canvas 48 x 96 in.
Jesse Krimes The Dance of Wretched Hands, 2022 Embroidery, used upholstery from formerly incarcerated people, antique quilt, image transfer 34½ x 84½ in.
Russell Craig Distress, 2022 Oil and acrylic paints on leather and canvas 56 x 56 in.
Russell Craig, No Time to Chill, 2022
Valerie Hegarty Studio Wall Fragment with Stain and Bird's Nest (The Covid Diaries Series), 2020 Epoxy resin, acrylic paint, papier mâché, inkjet prints, armature wire, foamcore 46 x 36 x 5 in.
Mark Loughney  Antenna TV, 2019  Acrylic on MDF panel. 30 x 24 in.
Mark Loughney  DUI in a UFO, 2020  Acrylic on MDF panel  36 x 24 in.
Mark Loughney  Prison Buddy (Artist Bol), 2022  Oil pastel on Bristol  12 x 9 in.
Mark Loughney  Prison Buddy (Losing It), 2022  Oil pastel on Bristol  12 x 9 in.
Mark Loughney  Prison Buddy (Merle), 2022  Oil pastel on Bristol  12 x 9 in.
Mychaelyn Michalec  Bigger Than a Baby's Arm, 2020  Hand tufted yarn with acrylic on stretched cloth  26 x 30 in.
Tom Prinsell The World is Yours, 2022 Oil on wood 34 x 47 in.

Press Release

Chelsea-based Malin Gallery is pleased to present the group exhibition Anthem X curated by artist Jared Owens, during Miami Art Week 2022. Located in Wynwood, the exhibition features artworks by 42 innovative artists each working from a singular perspective. The artists included represent some of the most promising artistic voices of now and the future. The exhibition foregrounds the work of an intergenerational cohort of artists excavating the sociocultural terrain in bracingly novel and radical ways. Working in a diverse array of media, the artists in Anthem X employ revolutionary approaches to reformulating personal and collective identities within the American context. The artists in this exhibition are united in their desire to amplify voices that counter past societal omissions and negations - to inspire as yet unknown anthems that speak to the power of previously obscured histories. The multiplicity of their perspectives cannot be reduced to a singular narrative or origin story; hence, Anthem X. A portion of sales from Anthem X will go to support the Right of Return USA Fellowship, co-founded by two exhibiting artists in the show, Jesse Krimes and Russell Craig. Right of Return is the only artistic fellowship that exclusively supports formerly-incarcerated artists.

Participating artists include: Timothy Bair, Daveed Baptiste, Mary Baxter, Bryana Bibbs, Bubi Canal, Angela China, Tameca Cole, Lindsey Brittain Collins, Michael Coppage, Russell Craig, Stef Duffy, Patricia Encarnación, Daniel Gaitor-Lomack, Valerie Hegarty, Heather Jones, Melissa Joseph, Jesse Krimes, Omar Lawson, Mark Loughney, SK Lyons, Chella Man, Marcus Manganni, Athena LaTocha, Sylvia Maier, Helina Metaferia, Mychaelyn Michalec, Amy Myers, Prinston Nnanna, Jared Owens, Tom Prinsell, Yuval Pudik, Ernesto Renda, Gilberto Rivera, Nazeer Sabree, Danielle Scott, Foad Satterfield, Stephanie H. Shih, Taryn Simon, Sagarika Sundaram, Maryam Turkey, Fletcher Williams, Cedric Wilson, and Aimee Wissman.

The organizing principle for Anthem X was inspired by Ada Limó n’s poem A New National Anthem, which addresses the racism and violence imbued within the The Star Spangled Banner, most overtly in its rarely-sung third stanza, and calls for an entirely new type of anthem. Limó n highlights how the National Anthem has been redacted over time yet retains searing elements of its racist origins - paralleling the ways in which orthodox accounts of American history have attempted to expunge the persistence of racism and exclusivity in American society. Limó n strips the National Anthem of its sacred character and calls instead for a new anthem, both more inclusive and less bellicose.

…And what of the stanzas we never sing, the third that mentions “no refuge could save the hireling of the slave”? Perhaps, the truth is, every song of this country has an unsung third stanza, something brutal snaking underneath us as we blindly sing…

Ada Limón, A New National Anthem, 2018 - 

Written during the War of 1812 by the young Francis Scott Key, an ardently pro-slavery lawyer and amateur poet, the Star Spangled Banner was considered controversial even in the early 19th century. It took more than a century before it was adopted as the “National Anthem.” The most troubling portion of the song is its third stanza, with which few Americans are familiar:

No refuge could save the hierling and the slave From the terror of Glight or the gloom of the grave, And the star spangled banner in triumph doth wave O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave

Francis Scott Key, The Star Spangled Banner, 1814 -

Notably, the Star Spangled Banner was only elevated to the status of “National Anthem” during the era of reconstruction, when attempts were made to codify racism in the nation’s laws and culture, with the erection of confederate memorials around the country, the imposition of Jim Crow laws and the emergence of the KKK as a signiYicant force in national politics.

As if to amplify Limó n’s call to action, the artists in this exhibition to make manifest obscured or negated histories and truth - united in their desire to reveal what is “snaking underneath us” and create as yet unsung anthems. Jared Owens, the exhibition curator explains:

For Anthem X, I selected artists whose practice has a foundation in social commentary and activism. Many of the the participants are artists whom I have personally befriended during my time as a fellow at Silver Arts and through studio visits and other associations. As a formerly incarcerated artist, I wanted to include examples of some of the stunning work being produced by other formerly-incarcerated artists. However, it was of great importance to me to show the work of formerly-incarcerated artists alongside that of other artists who have had not involvement with the criminal justice system. I also want the exhibition to illuminate some of the intersecting networks of afYinities that are a vital outcome of the residencies, studio programs and informal communities that sustain many artists today. Moreover, I hope that the show will facilitate creative cross pollination between the artists from these intersecting networks. My intent is to foster a deep dialogue among the participants that moves us towards a new, radically inclusive and forward looking “anthem."

Back To Top